SEATRADE

The SEATRADE line exists since more than 60 years and is present in all continents and carries all type of cargo even if it is specialized in reefer cargo transport. It is the leader in this sector.

SEATRADE stopover in the South Pacific for over 20 years. Vessels sail from Europe (Antwerp or Rotterdam, Dunkerque, Radicatel), go through the Panama Canal, calling Papeete and Nouméa, New Zealand, Peru, USA and back to Europe.

It's a direct line, without transhipment, which comes directly from Europe to the South Pacific with a transit time of 30 days: FAST DIRECT DEDICATED

The Agence Maritime Ballande represents locally the SEATRADE company. Its role is to prepare every call on all levels (operational, technical, administrative, medical, human ....). We meet the needs of the master and his crew members.

The Agence Maritime Ballande is also the direct local link between the receivers of the goods for import and SEATRADE company. It is also in charge of the marketing for export to New Zealand, Peru, USA and Europe.

To visit the site SEATRADE: www.seatrade.com

Price quotation: CLICK HERE

SCHEDULE:

  • IMPORT

prévisions-import.pdf

  • EXPORT

prévisions-export.pdf


CONTAINERS FEATURES

Gradually, as the maritime world is changing, Seatrade also evolves, adapts to customer needs by equipping new technologies.

Its fleet comprises more than 100 vessels and 8 more are under construction. This will be the reefer container ship, the first out of the site in August and the others will follow. They will have a capacity of 2200 teus and will be equipped with the latest technology. The containers will be controlled remotely, no need for physical verification, everything will be automated.

The SEATRADE ships were previously adapted to transport refrigerated conventional (fruit and vegetable pallets) and construction of new ships "container" will still continue the conventional transport such as iron and steel, motor vehicles ...

MAP

Import rotation in blue

Export rotation in red

PHOTOS OF VAN UNLOADING


PHOTOS OF VEHICLES UNLOADING